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Education brings wide-ranging benefits to the society. For instance, more educated people tend to live longer…

What is the ultimate purpose of education? Early philosophers such as Aristotle and Plato pointed out that education was central to the moral fulfilment of individuals and the well-being of the society in which they live. In the past few decades, research has supported this conventional wisdom, revealing that education not only enables individuals to perform better in the labour market, but also helps to improve their overall health, promote active citizenship and contain violence. The analysis below presents evidence on the relationship between education and social outcomes including health, civic engagement and subjective well-being across many OECD countries.

Life expectancy reflects a long trajectory of individuals’ socio-economic circumstances that affect their health conditions and other mortality risks. In OECD countries, life expectancy at birth, on average, reached 80 years in 2010. Women live almost six years longer than men, averaging 83 years vs. 77 for men.

Life expectancy reflects a long trajectory of individuals’ socio-economic circumstances that affect their health conditions and other mortality risks. In OECD countries, life expectancy at birth, on average, reached 80 years in 2010. Women live almost six years longer than men, averaging 83 years vs. 77 for men.

Data show that life expectancy is strongly associated with education. Full Article 

 

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Attention Global2 users: Department-funding for Global2 is being discontinued.

The Department of Education and Training will not be funding the use of Global2 past the end of the current contract on 31st of December 2020.

Please refer to FUSE for further details on the discontinuation of funding and transition options available for schools.